Psychology Wiki
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{{SocPsy}}
 
{{SocPsy}}
'''Zick Rubin''' (born 1944) is an Amercan social psychologist, now working as a publishing and copyright lawyer in Boston.
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'''Zick Rubin''' (born 1944) is an Amercan former social psychologist. He invented Rubin's Scales of Liking and Loving, a scale of romantic attachment.
   
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Rubin is now working as a publishing and copyright lawyer in Boston.
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=="Death" in 1997==
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In 2010, Rubin noticed that this Wikia entry reported his death in 1997. He attempted to correct this error, only to have his charge reverted, based on the fact that his death was reported in an authoritative source, Reber and Reber’s ''Dictionary of Psychology'', third edition. Numerous subsequent edits, both by Rubin and by other users, were also reverted. Rubin wrote a humorous op-ed piece about the episode, in which he compared himself to the title character in a children's book, ''The Bear that Wasn't'', who comes to doubt his own identity.
   
 
==See also==
 
==See also==

Revision as of 23:20, 13 March 2011

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Zick Rubin (born 1944) is an Amercan former social psychologist. He invented Rubin's Scales of Liking and Loving, a scale of romantic attachment.

Rubin is now working as a publishing and copyright lawyer in Boston.

"Death" in 1997

In 2010, Rubin noticed that this Wikia entry reported his death in 1997. He attempted to correct this error, only to have his charge reverted, based on the fact that his death was reported in an authoritative source, Reber and Reber’s Dictionary of Psychology, third edition. Numerous subsequent edits, both by Rubin and by other users, were also reverted. Rubin wrote a humorous op-ed piece about the episode, in which he compared himself to the title character in a children's book, The Bear that Wasn't, who comes to doubt his own identity.

See also

Publications

Books

Papers

  • Zick Rubin,(1975) “Disclosing Oneself to a Stranger: Reciprocity and Its Limits,” Journal of Experimental Social Psychology 11: 233-60
  • Rubin, Z & McNeil, E.B. (1983). The psychology of being human. Harper and Row ISBN 9780060443788 (4th Edition)

Other references