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Vinblastine chemical structure
Vinblastine

dimethyl (2β,3β,4β,5α,12β,19α)-15-[(5S,9S)-5-ethyl-5-hydroxy-9-(methoxycarbonyl)-1,4,5,6,7,8,9,10-octahydro-2H-3,7-methanoazacycloundecino[5,4-b]indol-9-yl]-3-hydroxy-16-methoxy-1-methyl-6,7-didehydroaspidospermidine-3,4-dicarboxylate
IUPAC name
CAS number
865-21-4
ATC code

L01CA01

PubChem
8935
DrugBank
APRD00708
Chemical formula {{{chemical_formula}}}
Molecular weight 810.974 g/mol
Bioavailability n/a
Metabolism Hepatic (CYP3A4-mediated)
Elimination half-life 24.8 hours (terminal)
Excretion Biliary and renal
Pregnancy category {{{pregnancy_category}}}
Legal status {{{legal_status}}}
Routes of administration Exclusively intravenous


Vinblastine is an anti-mitotic drug used as an antineoplastic drug to treat certain kinds of cancer, including Hodgkin's lymphoma, non-small cell lung cancer, breast cancer, head and neck cancer, and testicular cancer.

History[edit | edit source]

Vinblastine was first isolated by Robert Noble and Charles Thomas Beer from the Madagascar periwinkle plant. Vinblastine's utility as a chemotherapeutic agent was first discovered when it was crushed into a tea. Consumption of the tea led to a decreased number of white blood cells; therefore, it was hypothesized that vinblastine might be effective against cancers of the white blood cells such as lymphoma.

Pharmacology[edit | edit source]

Vinblastine is a vinca alkaloid and a chemical analogue of vincristine. It binds tubulin, thereby inhibiting the assembly of microtubules. It is M phase cell cycle specific since microtubules are a component of the mitotic spindle and the kinetochore which are necessary for the separation of chromosomes during anaphase of mitosis. Toxicities include bone marrow suppression (which is dose-limiting), gastrointestinal toxicity, potent vesicant (blister-forming) activity, and extravasation injury (forms deep ulcers).

Vinblastine paracrystals may be composed of tightly-packed unpolymerized tubulin or microtubules.[1]

Indications[edit | edit source]

Vinblastine is a component of a number of chemotherapy regimens, including ABVD for Hodgkin lymphoma. It is also used to treat histiocytosis according to the established protocols of the Histiocytosis Association of America.

See also[edit | edit source]

Footnotes[edit | edit source]


References[edit | edit source]

  • Bell, G. A., & Morgan, I. G. (1981). The effects of colchicine and vinblastine on memory in chicks: Behavioural Brain Research Vol 2(3) May 1981, 301-322.


File:Vinblastine.png

Vinblastine stick molecular model

Template:Chemotherapeutic agents


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