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{{SocPsy}}
 
{{SocPsy}}
 
{{PsyPerspective}}
 
{{PsyPerspective}}
 
{{Socialism}}
 
 
'''Socialism''' refers to a broad set of economic theories of social organization advocating state or collective ownership and administration of the [[means of production]] and distribution of goods, and an [[egalitarianism|egalitarian]] society characterized by equal opportunities for all individuals and a fair or egalitarian distribution of wealth.<ref name="SocialismAVeryShortIntroduction"> ''Newman, Michael''. (2005) ''Socialism: A Very Short Introduction'', Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-280431-6</ref><ref>[http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/socialism "Socialism"] ''[[Merriam-Webster]]''. Merriam Webster Online.</ref> Modern socialism originated in the late nineteenth-century [[working class]] political movement as well as the intellectual movement that criticized the effects of industrialization on society. [[Karl Marx]] posited that socialism would be achieved via [[class struggle]] and a [[proletarian revolution]] which represents the ''transitional'' stage between [[capitalism]] and [[communism]].<ref>Marx, Karl, ''Communist Manifesto, Penguin (2002)</ref><ref>[http://www.britannica.com/eb/article-9109587 "Socialism"] ''[[Encyclopedia Britannica]]''. 2006. Encyclopædia Britannica Online.</ref>
 
'''Socialism''' refers to a broad set of economic theories of social organization advocating state or collective ownership and administration of the [[means of production]] and distribution of goods, and an [[egalitarianism|egalitarian]] society characterized by equal opportunities for all individuals and a fair or egalitarian distribution of wealth.<ref name="SocialismAVeryShortIntroduction"> ''Newman, Michael''. (2005) ''Socialism: A Very Short Introduction'', Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-280431-6</ref><ref>[http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/socialism "Socialism"] ''[[Merriam-Webster]]''. Merriam Webster Online.</ref> Modern socialism originated in the late nineteenth-century [[working class]] political movement as well as the intellectual movement that criticized the effects of industrialization on society. [[Karl Marx]] posited that socialism would be achieved via [[class struggle]] and a [[proletarian revolution]] which represents the ''transitional'' stage between [[capitalism]] and [[communism]].<ref>Marx, Karl, ''Communist Manifesto, Penguin (2002)</ref><ref>[http://www.britannica.com/eb/article-9109587 "Socialism"] ''[[Encyclopedia Britannica]]''. 2006. Encyclopædia Britannica Online.</ref>
   

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