Psychology Wiki
 
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{{SocPsy}}
The study of seduction is still vastly more scientific and practical than anything advised by mainstream advice and social programming. Mainstream advice isn't given because it has been tested (even non-rigorously) and shown to work, but rather because it is accepted as an article of faith (and those who question it are often subject to strong disapproval). For example, where is the evidence that supplication or hiding one's sexuality around women is effective? There isn't any. Those behaviors are only accepted out of some combination of tradition and/or political correctness.
 
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In [[social psychology]], '''seduction''' (also called '''inveigling''' or '''wheedling''') is the process of deliberately enticing a person to engage in some sort of behavior, frequently sexual in nature. The word seduction stems from Indo-European roots and means literally "to lead astray." As a result, the term may have a positive or negative connotation.
   
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Seduction, seen negatively, involves [[temptation]] and enticement, often sexual in nature, to lead someone astray into a behavioural choice they would not have made if they were not in a state of [[sexual arousal]]. Seen positively, seduction is a synonym for the act of charming someone — male or female — by an appeal to the senses, often with the goal of reducing unfounded fears and leading to their (sexual) emancipation. The seducing agent may even be nonhuman, such as music or food. In contemporary academic debate, therefore, the morality of seduction depends on the long-term impacts on the individuals concerned, rather than the act itself, and may not necessarily carry the negative connotations expressed in dictionary definitions<ref>[http://www.scribd.com/doc/4912718/Emotion-Seduction-and-Intimacy-Alternative-Perspectives-on-Organisation-Behaviour Ridley-Duff, R. J. (2007) ''Emotion, Seduction and Intimacy: Alternative Perspectives on Organisation Behaviour'', Bracknell: Men's Hour Books], ISBN 978-0975430019</ref>.
   
== External links ==
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== Biological point of view ==
   
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[[Thierry Lodé]], a French biologist, proposed in his book <ref>[[Thierry Lodé]] La guerre des sexes chez les animaux, une histoire naturelle de la sexualité" Eds O Jacob, Paris, 2006</ref> that seduction could result from the supranormal stimulus. The trend towards exaggeration is a fundamental biological component which explains the exuberance of certain sexual traits; for instance: the peacock’s tail and the uca crab's pincers. [[Sexual selection]] and [[sexual conflict]] could amplify the maintenance of extreme specific characters by intensifying [[sexual desire]]. The bilateral symmetry is also an essential character in life. Most animals prefer to mate with sexual partners exhibiting symmetric pattern. Actually, symmetric traits are largely altered by growth and health, and asymmetry often reveals genetic problem or [[immune system]] ([[MHC]]) deficiencies.
   
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==See also==
[http://www.fastseduction.com fastseduction.com]
 
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* [[Beauty]]
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* [[Courtship]]
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* [[Charisma]]
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* [[Eros (love)]]
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* [[Flirting]]
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* [[Persuasion]]
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* [[Physical attractiveness]]
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* [[Romantic love]]
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==Bibliography==
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* [[Baudrillard]], J. (1991) ''Seduction''. New York: Saint Martin's Press. ISBN 0-312-05294-4
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* [[Kierkegaard]], S (1997) ''The Seducer's Diary''. [[Princeton University Press]]. ISBN 0-691-01737-9
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* Ridley-Duff, R. J. (2007) ''Emotion, Seduction and Intimacy: Alternative Perspectives on Organisation Behaviour'', Bracknell: Men's Hour Books. ISBN 978-0975430019
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==References==
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==External links==
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[[Category:Intimate relationships]]
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[[Category:Psychosexual behavior]]
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[[Category:Seduction]]
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[[Category:Sexual attraction]]
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Revision as of 22:24, 19 January 2009

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In social psychology, seduction (also called inveigling or wheedling) is the process of deliberately enticing a person to engage in some sort of behavior, frequently sexual in nature. The word seduction stems from Indo-European roots and means literally "to lead astray." As a result, the term may have a positive or negative connotation.

Seduction, seen negatively, involves temptation and enticement, often sexual in nature, to lead someone astray into a behavioural choice they would not have made if they were not in a state of sexual arousal. Seen positively, seduction is a synonym for the act of charming someone — male or female — by an appeal to the senses, often with the goal of reducing unfounded fears and leading to their (sexual) emancipation. The seducing agent may even be nonhuman, such as music or food. In contemporary academic debate, therefore, the morality of seduction depends on the long-term impacts on the individuals concerned, rather than the act itself, and may not necessarily carry the negative connotations expressed in dictionary definitions[1].

Biological point of view

Thierry Lodé, a French biologist, proposed in his book [2] that seduction could result from the supranormal stimulus. The trend towards exaggeration is a fundamental biological component which explains the exuberance of certain sexual traits; for instance: the peacock’s tail and the uca crab's pincers. Sexual selection and sexual conflict could amplify the maintenance of extreme specific characters by intensifying sexual desire. The bilateral symmetry is also an essential character in life. Most animals prefer to mate with sexual partners exhibiting symmetric pattern. Actually, symmetric traits are largely altered by growth and health, and asymmetry often reveals genetic problem or immune system (MHC) deficiencies.

See also


Bibliography

References

  1. Ridley-Duff, R. J. (2007) Emotion, Seduction and Intimacy: Alternative Perspectives on Organisation Behaviour, Bracknell: Men's Hour Books, ISBN 978-0975430019
  2. Thierry Lodé La guerre des sexes chez les animaux, une histoire naturelle de la sexualité" Eds O Jacob, Paris, 2006


External links


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