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== Religious and spiritual views on forgiveness ==
 
== Religious and spiritual views on forgiveness ==
=== Buddhism ===
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=== ===
   
 
; Quotes ([http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Forgiveness#Buddhism more quotes here])
In [[Buddhism]], forgiveness is seen as a practice to prevent harmful emotions from causing havoc on one’s mental well-being.<ref>{{cite web | year = 2006 | url = http://www.psychjourney.com/Buddhism%20Series.htm | title = Psychjourney – Introduction to Buddhism Series | accessdate = 2006-06-19}}</ref> Buddhism recognizes that feelings of hatred and ill-will leave a lasting effect on our mind [[karma]] and instead encourages the cultivation of emotions which leave a wholesome effect. "In contemplating the law of kamma, we realize that it is not a matter of seeking revenge but of practicing metta and forgiveness, for the victimizer is, truly, the most unfortunate of all.<ref>{{cite web | year = 2006 | url = http://www.abhayagiri.org/index.php/main/article/universal_loving_kindness/#top| title = Abhayagiri Buddhist Monastery - Universal Loving Kindness | accessdate = 2006-06-19}}</ref> When resentments have already arisen, the Buddhist view is to calmly proceed to release them by going back to their roots. Buddhism centers on release from delusion and suffering through meditation and receiving insight into the nature of reality.
 
Buddhism questions the reality of the passions that make forgiveness necessary as well as the reality of the objects of those passions.<ref>{{cite web | year = 2006 | url = http://josephsoleary.typepad.com/my_weblog/buddhism/index.html | title = Spirit of Vatican II: Buddhism – Buddhism and Forgiveness | accessdate = 2006-06-19}}</ref> "If we haven’t forgiven, we keep creating an identity around our pain, and that is what is reborn. That is what suffers."<ref>{{cite web | year = 2006 | url = http://www.abhayagiri.org/index.php/main/article/preparing_for_death/#top | title = Abhayagiri Buddhist Monastery - Preparing for Death | accessdate = 2006-06-19}}</ref>
 
   
 
: ''‘He abused me, he struck me, he overcame me, he robbed me’ ''
Buddhism places much emphasis on the concepts of ''[[Mettā]]'' (loving kindness), ''[[karuna]]'' (compassion), ''[[mudita]]'' (sympathetic joy), and ''[[upekkhā]]'' (equanimity), as a means to avoiding resentments in the first place. These reflections are used to understand the context of suffering in the world, both our own and the suffering of others.
 
 
: ''— in those who harbor such thoughts hatred will never cease.''
 
; Quotes ([http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Forgiveness#Buddhism more quotes here])
 
 
: ''‘He abused me, he struck me, he overcame me, he robbed me’
 
: '' — in those who harbor such thoughts hatred will never cease.''
 
 
: ([[Dhammapada]] 1.3-4; trans. [[Radhakrishnan]])
 
: ([[Dhammapada]] 1.3-4; trans. [[Radhakrishnan]])
   

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