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{{EdPsy}}
 
{{EdPsy}}
 
{{expert}}
 
{{expert}}
[[Educational psychology|Educational psychologists]] and [[pedagogue]]s have identified several '''principles of learning''', also referred to as '''laws of learning''', which seem generally applicable to the [[learning]] process. These principles have been discovered, tested, and used in practical situations. They provide additional insight into what makes people learn most effectively. [[Edward Thorndike]] developed the first three "Laws of learning:" ''readiness'', ''exercise'', and ''effect''. Since Thorndike set down his basic three laws in the early part of the twentieth century, five additional principles have been added: , ''recency'', ''intensity'', ''freedom'' and ''requirement''.
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[[Educational psychology|Educational psychologists]] and [[pedagogue]]s have identified several '''principles of learning''', also referred to as '''laws of learning''', which seem generally applicable to the [[learning]] process. These principles have been discovered, tested, and used in practical situations. They provide additional insight into what makes people learn most effectively. [[Edward Thorndike]] developed the first three "Laws of learning:" ''readiness'', ''exercise'', and ''effect''. Since Thorndike set down his basic three laws in the early part of the twentieth century, five additional principles have been added: ''primacy'', ''recency'', ''intensity'', ''freedom'' and ''requirement''.
   
 
The majority of these principles are widely applied in aerospace instruction, and some in many other fields, as outlined below:
 
The majority of these principles are widely applied in aerospace instruction, and some in many other fields, as outlined below:
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{{main|Law of effect}}
 
{{main|Law of effect}}
   
[[File:Girl swimming.jpg|thumb|250px|right|Enjoying the water - Learning backstroke [http://www.flickr.com/photos/gracewong/141384577/ photo by Tom@HK]|link=Special:FilePath/Girl_swimming.jpg]]
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[[File:Girl swimming.jpg|thumb|250px|right|Enjoying the water - Learning backstroke [http://www.flickr.com/photos/gracewong/141384577/ photo by Tom@HK]]]
   
 
The principle of '''effect''' is based on the emotional reaction of the student. It has a direct relationship to motivation. The principle of effect is that learning is strengthened when accompanied by a [[Reward system|pleasant or satisfying feeling]], and that learning is weakened when associated with an unpleasant feeling. The student will strive to continue doing what provides a pleasant effect to continue learning. Positive [[reinforcement]] is more apt to lead to success and motivate the learner, so the instructor should recognize and commend improvement. Whatever the learning situation, it should contain elements that affect the students positively and give them a feeling of satisfaction. Therefore, instructors should be cautious about using punishment in the classroom.
 
The principle of '''effect''' is based on the emotional reaction of the student. It has a direct relationship to motivation. The principle of effect is that learning is strengthened when accompanied by a [[Reward system|pleasant or satisfying feeling]], and that learning is weakened when associated with an unpleasant feeling. The student will strive to continue doing what provides a pleasant effect to continue learning. Positive [[reinforcement]] is more apt to lead to success and motivate the learner, so the instructor should recognize and commend improvement. Whatever the learning situation, it should contain elements that affect the students positively and give them a feeling of satisfaction. Therefore, instructors should be cautious about using punishment in the classroom.

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