Psychology Wiki
Advertisement

Assessment | Biopsychology | Comparative | Cognitive | Developmental | Language | Individual differences | Personality | Philosophy | Social |
Methods | Statistics | Clinical | Educational | Industrial | Professional items | World psychology |

Biological: Behavioural genetics · Evolutionary psychology · Neuroanatomy · Neurochemistry · Neuroendocrinology · Neuroscience · Psychoneuroimmunology · Physiological Psychology · Psychopharmacology (Index, Outline)


Phosphorylase is a family of allosteric enzymes that catalyze the production of glucose-1-phosphate from a polyglucose such as glycogen, starch or maltodextrin. Phosphorylase is also a common name used for glycogen phosphorylase in honor of Earl W. Sutherland Jr. who in the late 1930's discovered the first phosphorylase. [1]

Function[]

More generally, phosphorylases are enzymes that catalyze the addition of a phosphate group from an inorganic phosphate (phosphate+hydrogen) to an acceptor. Do not confuse this enzyme with a phosphatase or a kinase. A phosphatase removes a phosphate group from a donor, while a kinase transfers a phosphate group from a donor (usually ATP) to an acceptor.

Types[]

The phosphorylases are named by prepending the name of the substrate, e.g. glycogen phosphorylase, starch phosphorylase, maltodextrin phosphorylase.

All known phosphorylases share catalytic and structural properties [1].

Activation[]

Phosphorylase a is the active form of glycogen phosphorylase that is derived from the phosphorylation of the inactive form, phosphorylase b.

Pathology[]

Some disorders are related to phosphorylases:

  • Glycogen storage disease type V - muscle glycogen
  • Glycogen storage disease type VI - liver glycogen

External links[]



This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia (view authors).
  1. Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry 5th ed. pg. 603
Advertisement