Assessment | Biopsychology | Comparative | Cognitive | Developmental | Language | Individual differences | Personality | Philosophy | Social |
Methods | Statistics | Clinical | Educational | Industrial | Professional items | World psychology |

Biological: Behavioural genetics · Evolutionary psychology · Neuroanatomy · Neurochemistry · Neuroendocrinology · Neuroscience · Psychoneuroimmunology · Physiological Psychology · Psychopharmacology (Index, Outline)


parvalbumin
Symbol(s): PVALB
Locus: 22 q12 -q13.1
EC number [1]
EntrezGene 5816
OMIM 168890
RefSeq NM_002854
UniProt P20472

Parvalbumin is a calcium binding albumin protein.

It has three EF hand motifs and is structurally related to calmodulin and troponin C. Parvalbumin is localised in fast-contracting muscles, where its levels are highest, and in the brain and some endocrine tissues.

Neuronal role of parvalbumin[edit | edit source]

Parvalbumin is present in GABAergic interneurons in the nervous system, predominantly expressed by chandelier and basket cells in the cortex. In the hippocampus, PV+ interneurons are subdivided into basket, axo-axonic, bistratified, and oriens-lacunosum moleculare (O-LM) cells, each subtype targeting distinct domains of pyramidal cells.[1] Parvalbumin (PV) interneurons' connections are mostly perisomatic (around the cell body of neurons). Most of the PV interneurons are fast-spiking. They are also thought to give rise to gamma waves recorded in EEG.

PV-expressing interneurons represent approximately 25% of GABA cells in the primate DLPFC.[2][3] Other calcium-binding protein markers are calretinin (most abundant subtype in DLPFC, about 50%) and calbindin. Interneurons are also divided into subgroups by the expression of neuropeptides (somatostatin, neuropeptide Y, cholecystokinin).

Role in pathology[edit | edit source]

Decreased PV and GAD67 expression was found in PV+ GABAergic interneurons in schizophrenia.[4]

PV has been identified as an allergen causing seafood allergy.[5]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Klausberger T, Marton LF, O'Neill J, Huck JH, Dalezios Y, Fuentealba P, Suen WY, Papp E, Kaneko T, Watanabe M, Csicsvari J, Somogyi P (2005). Complementary roles of cholecystokinin- and parvalbumin-expressing GABAergic neurons in hippocampal network oscillations. J. Neurosci. 25 (42): 9782–93.free full text
  2. Condé F, Lund JS, Jacobowitz DM, Baimbridge KG, Lewis DA (1994). Local circuit neurons immunoreactive for calretinin, calbindin D-28k or parvalbumin in monkey prefrontal cortex: distribution and morphology. J. Comp. Neurol. 341 (1): 95–116.
  3. Gabbott PL, Bacon SJ (1996). Local circuit neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (areas 24a,b,c, 25 and 32) in the monkey: II. Quantitative areal and laminar distributions. J. Comp. Neurol. 364 (4): 609–36.
  4. Hashimoto T, Volk DW, Eggan SM, Mirnics K, Pierri JN, Sun Z, Sampson AR, Lewis DA (2003). Gene expression deficits in a subclass of GABA neurons in the prefrontal cortex of subjects with schizophrenia. J. Neurosci. 23 (15): 6315–26. free full text
  5. Swoboda I, Bugajska-Schretter A, Verdino P, Keller W, Sperr WR, Valent P, Valenta R, Spitzauer S (2002). Recombinant carp parvalbumin, the major cross-reactive fish allergen: a tool for diagnosis and therapy of fish allergy. J. Immunol. 168 (9): 4576–84.

External links[edit | edit source]


Template:Albumins

This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia (view authors).
Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.