Edit Page
Source Editor

Warning: You are not logged in. Your IP address will be publicly visible if you make any edits. If you log in or create an account, your edits will be attributed to your username, along with other benefits.

The edit can be undone. Please check the comparison below to verify that this is what you want to do, and then save the changes below to finish undoing the edit.

This page supports semantic in-text annotations (e.g. "[[Is specified as::World Heritage Site]]") to build structured and queryable content provided by Semantic MediaWiki. For a comprehensive description on how to use annotations or the #ask parser function, please have a look at the getting started, in-text annotation, or inline queries help pages.

Latest revision Your text
Line 1: Line 1:
 
{{BioPsy}}
 
{{BioPsy}}
{{PsyPerspective}}
 
 
 
[[Nasal mucus]] is produced by the nasal [[mucosa]], and mucal tissues lining the [[airways]] ([[Vertebrate trachea|trachea]], [[bronchus]], [[bronchioles]]) is produced by specialized airway epithelial cells ([[goblet cells]]) and [[submucosal glands]]. Small particles such as dust, particulate [[pollutant]]s, and [[allergen]]s as well as [[infectious agent]]s such as [[bacteria]] are caught in the viscous nasal or airway mucus and prevented from entering the system. This event along with the continual movement of the respiratory mucus layer toward the [[oropharynx]], helps prevent foreign objects from entering the lungs during breathing. Additionally, mucus aids in moisturizing the inhaled air and prevents [[Tissue (biology)|tissues]] such as the [[Nasal cavity|nasal]] and [[respiratory epithelium|airway epithelia]] from drying out.<ref name="annu-rev-physiol">{{cite journal
 
[[Nasal mucus]] is produced by the nasal [[mucosa]], and mucal tissues lining the [[airways]] ([[Vertebrate trachea|trachea]], [[bronchus]], [[bronchioles]]) is produced by specialized airway epithelial cells ([[goblet cells]]) and [[submucosal glands]]. Small particles such as dust, particulate [[pollutant]]s, and [[allergen]]s as well as [[infectious agent]]s such as [[bacteria]] are caught in the viscous nasal or airway mucus and prevented from entering the system. This event along with the continual movement of the respiratory mucus layer toward the [[oropharynx]], helps prevent foreign objects from entering the lungs during breathing. Additionally, mucus aids in moisturizing the inhaled air and prevents [[Tissue (biology)|tissues]] such as the [[Nasal cavity|nasal]] and [[respiratory epithelium|airway epithelia]] from drying out.<ref name="annu-rev-physiol">{{cite journal
 
| last1 = Thorton
 
| last1 = Thorton

Please note that all contributions to the Psychology Wiki are considered to be released under the CC-BY-SA

Cancel Editing help (opens in new window)