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Man and His Symbols is the last psychological work undertaken by Carl Jung before his death in 1961. First published in 1964, it is divided into five parts, four of which are written by associates of Jung: Joseph L. Henderson, Marie-Louise von Franz, Aniella Jaffé, and Jolande Jacobi. The book is meant to be an introduction to Jung's theories and was originally written for a general audience rather than psychology students.

Editions[edit | edit source]

The book has been reprinted several times since initial publication, including:

External links[edit | edit source]


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