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The illusion of asymmetric insight is a cognitive bias that involves the fact that people perceive their knowledge of others to surpass other people's knowledge of them. The source for this bias seems to stem from the fact that observed behaviors of others are more revealing than one's own similar behaviors.[1]

Relatedly, people seem to believe that they know themselves better than their peers know themselves and that their social group knows and understands other social groups better than that social group knows them.

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Pronin E., Kruger J., Savitsky K., Ross L. (2001). "Journal of Personality & Social Psychology, 81"(4), 639-56.

See also[edit | edit source]

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