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Homicide
Murder
Felony murder
Consensual homicide
Negligent homicide
Vehicular homicide
Honour killing
Assassination
Ritual murder
Proxy murder
Torture murder
Murder-suicide
Spree killer
Child murder
Lynching
Lust murder
Mass murder
Serial killer
Human sacrifice
Manslaughter
In English law
Non-criminal homicide
Justifiable homicide
Capital punishment
Other types of homicide
Democide
Deicide
Familicide
Filicide
Fratricide
Genocide
Infanticide
Mariticide
Matricide
Parricide
Patricide
Regicide
Sororicide
Uxoricide

Etymology: Latin homicidium, from homo- human being + caedere- to cut, kill

Homicide refers to the act of killing another human being. Reportedly, it can also describe a person who has committed such an act, though this use is rare in modern English. Although homicide does not define an illegal act necessarily, reportedly some jurisdictions use the word to indicate the unlawful killing of a person.

A Nolo Press glossary definition claims the legal definition of homicide involves, "The killing of one human being by the act or omission of another." A homicide defines any killing of one human being by another, criminal or otherwise. "Homicide is considered noncriminal in a number of situations, including deaths as the result of war and putting someone to death by the valid sentence of a court." Click Nolo Press's link for to see further definition of the term.

Homicidal crimes[]

According to U.S. Legal, the law typically considers criminal homicide, or murder, a malum in se immorality, and every legal system contains some form of prohibition or regulation of criminal homicide.

Homicidal crimes include:

  • murder/murder in English law
    • Felony murder
    • Capital murder
  • manslaughter/manslaughter in English law
    • voluntary manslaughter
    • involuntary manslaughter
    • Intoxication manslaughter
    • Death by dangerous driving
    • reckless manslaughter
  • Criminal Homicide
    • culpable homicide (in Scots law)
    • negligent homicide (in some criminal jurisdictions)
    • Criminally negligent homicide


Many forms of 'homicide' have their own term based on the person being killed.

Non-criminal homicide[]

Homicides do not always involve a crime. Sometimes the law allows homicide either through certain defenses to criminal charges, or through exceptions or circumstances, e.g. state executions. Some legal homicides include:


See also=[]


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