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{{SocPsy}}
 
{{SocPsy}}
In [[criminology]], [[psychology]], and [[sociology]], the '''contact hypothesis''' has been described as one of the best ways to improve relations among groups that are experiencing conflict.<ref>Brown, R., & Hewstone, M. (2005). An integrative theory of intergroup contact. In M. P. Zanna (Ed.), Advances in experimental social psychology (Vol. 37,pp. 255–343). San Diego, CA: Elsevier Academic Press.</ref><ref>Wright, S. C. (2009). Cross-group contact effects. In S. Otten, T. Kessler & K. Sassenberg (Eds.), Intergroup relations: The role of emotion and motivation (pp. 262–283). New York, NY: Psychology Press.</ref> [[Gordon W. Allport]] (1954) is often credited with the development of the Contact Hypothesis, also known as '''Intergroup Contact Theory''' ICT. The premise of Allport's theory states that under appropriate conditions interpersonal contact is one of the most effective ways to reduce prejudice between majority and minority group members.<ref name="Allport">Allport, G. W. (1954). The nature of prejudice. Cambridge, MA: Perseus Books</ref> If one has the opportunity to communicate with others, they are able to understand and appreciate different points of views involving their way of life. As a result of new appreciation and understanding, prejudice should diminish.<ref>Whitley, B.E., & Kite, M.E. (2010). The Psychology of Prejudice and Discrimination. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.</ref> Issues of [[stereotyping]], [[prejudice]], and [[discrimination]] are commonly occurring issues between rival groups. Allport's proposal was that properly managed contact between the groups should reduce these problems and lead to better interactions.
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In [[criminology]], [[psychology]], and [[sociology]], the '''contact hypothesis''' has been described as one of the best ways to improve relations among groups that are experiencing conflict.<ref>Brown, R., & Hewstone, M. (2005). An integrative theory of intergroup contact. In M. P. Zanna (Ed.), Advances in experimental social psychology (Vol. 37,pp. 255–343). San Diego, CA: Elsevier Academic Press.</ref><ref>Wright, S. C. (2009). Cross-group contact effects. In S. Otten, T. Kessler & K. Sassenberg (Eds.), Intergroup relations: The role of emotion and motivation (pp. 262–283). New York, NY: Psychology Press.</ref> [[Gordon W. Allport]] (1954) is often credited with the development of the Contact Hypothesis, also known as Intergroup Contact Theory. The premise of Allport's theory states that under appropriate conditions interpersonal contact is one of the most effective ways to reduce prejudice between majority and minority group members.<ref name="Allport">Allport, G. W. (1954). The nature of prejudice. Cambridge, MA: Perseus Books</ref> If one has the opportunity to communicate with others, they are able to understand and appreciate different points of views involving their way of life. As a result of new appreciation and understanding, prejudice should diminish.<ref>Whitley, B.E., & Kite, M.E. (2010). The Psychology of Prejudice and Discrimination. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.</ref> Issues of [[stereotyping]], [[prejudice]], and [[discrimination]] are commonly occurring issues between rival groups. Allport's proposal was that properly managed contact between the groups should reduce these problems and lead to better interactions.
   
 
In order for this to occur, these 4 criteria must be present:
 
In order for this to occur, these 4 criteria must be present:
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==See also==
 
==See also==
*[[Conflict resolution]]
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[[Conflict resolution]]
*[[Intergroup dynamics]]
 
   
 
==References==
 
==References==
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[[Category:Conflict resolution]]
 
[[Category:Conflict resolution]]
[[Category:Intergroup dynamics]]
 
 
[[Category:Groups]]
 
[[Category:Groups]]
   

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