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Owing to its muscarinic and nicotinic agonist properties, arecoline has shown improvement in the learning ability of healthy volunteers. Since one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease is a cognitive decline, arecoline was suggested as a treatment to slow down this process and arecoline administered via i.v. route did indeed show modest verbal and spatial memory improvement in Alzheimer's patients, though due to arecoline's possible carcinogenic properties, <ref name="carcinogen-Saikia">{{cite journal | author=Saikia JR, Schneeweiss FH, Sharan RN. | title=Arecoline-induced changes of poly-ADP-ribosylation of cellular proteins and its influence on chromatin organization. | journal=Cancer Letters. | year=1999 | pages=59&ndash;65 | volume=139 | issue=1 | id=PMID 10408909}}</ref> it is not the first drug of choice for this degenerative disease. <ref name="Alzheimer's">{{cite journal | journal=British Journal of Psychiatry | author=Christie JE, Shering A, Ferguson J | title=Physostigmine and arecoline: effects of intravenous infusions in Alzheimer’s presenile dementia | year=1981 | pages=46&ndash;50 | volume=138 | id=PMID 7023592}}</ref>
 
Owing to its muscarinic and nicotinic agonist properties, arecoline has shown improvement in the learning ability of healthy volunteers. Since one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease is a cognitive decline, arecoline was suggested as a treatment to slow down this process and arecoline administered via i.v. route did indeed show modest verbal and spatial memory improvement in Alzheimer's patients, though due to arecoline's possible carcinogenic properties, <ref name="carcinogen-Saikia">{{cite journal | author=Saikia JR, Schneeweiss FH, Sharan RN. | title=Arecoline-induced changes of poly-ADP-ribosylation of cellular proteins and its influence on chromatin organization. | journal=Cancer Letters. | year=1999 | pages=59&ndash;65 | volume=139 | issue=1 | id=PMID 10408909}}</ref> it is not the first drug of choice for this degenerative disease. <ref name="Alzheimer's">{{cite journal | journal=British Journal of Psychiatry | author=Christie JE, Shering A, Ferguson J | title=Physostigmine and arecoline: effects of intravenous infusions in Alzheimer’s presenile dementia | year=1981 | pages=46&ndash;50 | volume=138 | id=PMID 7023592}}</ref>
   
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Arecoline has also been used medicinally as an antihelmintic (a drug against parasitic worms).<ref name="pmid12121538">{{cite journal |author=Yusuf H, Yong SL |title=Oral submucous fibrosis in a 12-year-old Bangladeshi boy: a case report and review of literature |journal=International journal of paediatric dentistry / the British Paedodontic Society [and] the International Association of Dentistry for Children |volume=12 |issue=4 |pages=271-6 |year=2002 |pmid=12121538 |doi=}}</ref>
 
==See also==
 
*[[Bromides]]
 
*[[Cholinomimetic drugs]]
 
   
 
==References==
 
==References==
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[[Category:Alzheimer's disease]]
 
[[Category:Alzheimer's disease]]
 
[[Category:Muscarinic agonists]]
 
[[Category:Muscarinic agonists]]
[[Category:Cholinomimetic drugs]]
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[[Category:Nitrogen heterocycles]]
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[[Category:Carboxylate esters]]
   
 
:de:Arecolin
 
:de:Arecolin

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