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{{PersonPsy}}
 
{{PersonPsy}}
   
'''Agreeableness''' is a [[personality trait]] in which there is tendency to be pleasant and accommodating in social situations. In contemporary [[personality psychology]], agreeableness is one of the [[Big five personality traits|five major dimensions]] of personality structure, reflecting [[individual differences]] in concern for cooperation and social harmony. People who score high on this dimension are [[empathetic]], considerate, friendly, generous, helpful, and generally [[likable]]. They also have an [[optimistic]] view of [[human nature]]. They tend to [[believe]] that most people are [[honest]], decent, and [[trustworthy]].
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'''Agreeableness''' is a [[personality trait]] in which there is tendency to be pleasant and accommodating in social situations. In contemporary [[personality psychology]], agreeableness is one of the [[Big five personality traits|five major dimensions]] of personality structure, reflecting [[individual differences]] in concern for cooperation and social harmony. People who score high on this dimension are [[empathetic]], considerate, friendly, [[generous]], helpful, and generally [[likable]]. They also have an [[optimistic]] view of [[human nature]]. They tend to [[believe]] that most people are [[honest]], decent, and [[trustworthy]].
   
 
People scoring ''low'' on agreeableness place self-interest above getting along with others. They are generally less concerned with others' well-being, and therefore less likely to go out of their way to help others. Sometimes their [[skepticism]] about others' motives causes them to be suspicious and unfriendly. People very low on agreeableness have a tendency to be manipulative in their social relationships. They are more likely to compete than to cooperate.
 
People scoring ''low'' on agreeableness place self-interest above getting along with others. They are generally less concerned with others' well-being, and therefore less likely to go out of their way to help others. Sometimes their [[skepticism]] about others' motives causes them to be suspicious and unfriendly. People very low on agreeableness have a tendency to be manipulative in their social relationships. They are more likely to compete than to cooperate.
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==Implications==
 
==Implications==
Where psychopathology is concerned, high agreeableness is associated with [[dependency]], whereas low agreeableness is associated with [[narcissist]]ic and anti-social tendencies (Costa & McCrae, 1992).
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Where psychopathology is concerned, high agreeableness is associated with [[dependency]], whereas low agreeableness is associated with [[narcissist]]ic and anti-social tendencies (Costa & McCrae, 1992).
   
 
Agreeableness can be viewed as the opposite of the trait of [[machiavellianism]]. It is also similar to [[Alfred Adler]]'s idea of ''social interest''.
 
Agreeableness can be viewed as the opposite of the trait of [[machiavellianism]]. It is also similar to [[Alfred Adler]]'s idea of ''social interest''.
   
   
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==See also==
 
==See also==
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*[[Social skills]]
 
*[[Social skills]]
   
==References & Bibliography==
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==References & Bibliography==
 
<References/>
 
<References/>
==Key texts==
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==Key texts==
 
===Books===
 
===Books===
 
*Costa, P. T. & McCrae, R. R. (1992). ''NEO personality Inventory professional manual''. Odessa, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources.
 
*Costa, P. T. & McCrae, R. R. (1992). ''NEO personality Inventory professional manual''. Odessa, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources.
 
===Papers===
 
===Papers===
*Jensen-Campbell, L. A., & Graziano, W. G. (2001). Agreeableness as a moderator of interpersonal conflict. ''Journal of Personality'', ''69'', 323- 361.
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*Jensen-Campbell, L. A., & Graziano, W. G. (2001). Agreeableness as a moderator of interpersonal conflict. ''Journal of Personality'', ''69'', 323- 361.
 
==Additional material==
 
==Additional material==
 
===Books===
 
===Books===
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{{enWP|Agreeableness}}
 
 
[[Category:Personality traits]]
 
[[Category:Personality traits]]
 
{{enWP|Agreeableness}}

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